Parole conditions

The Board is required by law to impose 10 core parole conditions on every parole order. The Board may also impose discretionary conditions depending on a prisoner’s individual circumstances. If a prisoner breaches a condition, their parole may be cancelled and they may be returned to custody.

Core conditions

The ten core conditions are:

  1. You must not break any law.
  2. You must report to the community corrections centre specified in this Order within two clear working days after this Order comes into force.
  3. You must notify a community corrections officer of any change of address at least two clear working days before the change of address.
  4. You must notify a community corrections officer of any change of employment within at least two clear working days of the change of employment.
  5. You are under the supervision of a community corrections officer.
  6. You must report to, and receive visits from, a community corrections officer as and when directed by the community corrections officer.
  7. You must be available for an interview by a community corrections officer, the Regional Manager or the Adult Parole Board at the time and place as directed by the community corrections officer or the Regional Manager or Adult Parole Board.
  8. You must attend in person at a community corrections centre as directed in writing by a community corrections officer.
  9. You must not leave Victoria without the written permission of the Regional Manager.
  10. You must comply with any direction given by a community corrections officer or the Regional Manager or the Adult Parole Board that is necessary for a community corrections officer or the Regional Manager or the Adult Parole Board to give to ensure that you comply with this Order.

Discretionary conditions

Discretionary conditions may relate to:

  • alcohol abstinence
  • drug testing
  • curfews
  • residential restrictions
  • geographical restrictions prohibiting entry into specified areas
  • victim contact restrictions
  • participation in rehabilitation programs
  • community work
  • electronic monitoring – both geographical and alcohol consumption.

Varying and revoking conditions

The Board can vary the conditions of a parole order at any time during the parole period. Conditions can be added to respond to changes in risk. Alternatively, conditions can be revoked if the prisoner has been performing well on parole for a long period. The Board’s primary consideration is always the safety and protection of the community.